When Scientists Get Accidentally Artsy

Smithsonian museum specialist Sandra Raredon has been making radiographs, or X-ray images, for some 25 years. And although she doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist, per se, she’s not surprised to see her work on display in that context. “I wanted people to see that they’re not only scientific, but they’re beautiful as well,” she says on the phone.
When Scientists Get Accidentally Artsy

Smithsonian museum specialist Sandra Raredon has been making radiographs, or X-ray images, for some 25 years. And although she doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist, per se, she’s not surprised to see her work on display in that context. “I wanted people to see that they’re not only scientific, but they’re beautiful as well,” she says on the phone.
When Scientists Get Accidentally Artsy

Smithsonian museum specialist Sandra Raredon has been making radiographs, or X-ray images, for some 25 years. And although she doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist, per se, she’s not surprised to see her work on display in that context. “I wanted people to see that they’re not only scientific, but they’re beautiful as well,” she says on the phone.

When Scientists Get Accidentally Artsy

Smithsonian museum specialist Sandra Raredon has been making radiographs, or X-ray images, for some 25 years. And although she doesn’t necessarily consider herself an artist, per se, she’s not surprised to see her work on display in that context. “I wanted people to see that they’re not only scientific, but they’re beautiful as well,” she says on the phone.